Blinken discusses trade, migration with Mexican counterpart | Politics News

High US diplomat Antony Blinken travels to Mexico Metropolis for high-level financial talks with Mexican authorities officers.

United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken has mentioned “problems with mutual curiosity” together with his Mexican counterpart, together with drug trafficking, migration and commerce, as prime officers from the 2 nations met for high-level financial talks in Mexico Metropolis.

The US State Division stated in an announcement on Monday that Blinken famous “his continued appreciation for collaboration with Mexico” in his discussions with Mexico’s Overseas Minister Marcelo Ebrard.

“Additionally they mentioned regional efforts to assist the folks of Haiti as properly Mexico and the USA’s continued cooperation to create a more practical United Nations,” US State Division Spokesperson Ned Value stated within the assertion.

Blinken was joined by US Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo and different Biden administration officers on the journey to the Mexican capital for this 12 months’s US-Mexico Excessive-Stage Financial Dialogue.

“Final 12 months, our two presidents agreed to relaunch the high-level financial dialogue. They recognised collectively {that a} robust US-Mexico relationship was important,” Blinken stated through the talks.

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador struck a conciliatory notice earlier within the day on a serious dispute with the US over Mexican power coverage, saying Washington had adopted a extra respectful perspective in direction of his place.

In July, the US commerce consultant demanded dispute settlement talks with Mexico, arguing Lopez Obrador’s drive to tighten state management of the power market was unfair to US firms and sure in breach of a regional commerce deal.

Lopez Obrador, who has forged his power coverage as a matter of nationwide sovereignty, on the time responded defiantly, saying he would defend Mexico’s place at an independence day navy parade happening this coming Friday.

Nevertheless, on Monday he stated he would now not consult with the power dispute throughout his Friday speech as a result of US President Joe Biden had responded to his issues positively.

“There’s a distinct tone. There’s a respectful perspective. Reasonably, it’s a reaffirmation of respect for our nationwide sovereignty,” Lopez Obrador informed an everyday information convention, referring to a letter he stated he obtained from Biden.

Translation: I had the pleasure of welcoming Antony Blinken, US Secretary of State, and Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo. Welcome!

The US power criticism, which Canada instantly joined, is arguably essentially the most vital dispute to floor below the United States-Mexico-Canada Settlement (USMCA) for the reason that North American commerce deal got here into impact in 2020.

If unresolved, it might result in the imposition of hefty commerce tariffs in opposition to Mexico, analysts say.

Ebrard, the Mexican international minister, stated Monday’s talks had been very productive and that Mexico had been invited to take part in a US push to strengthen semiconductor output and electromobility in North America.

Ebrard added that the power dispute was not the point of interest of Monday’s agenda and that it had taken up “not more than 5 p.c” of the dialog within the presidential palace.

Washington is more and more seeking to the Mexican authorities to assist tackle the rising variety of refugees and migrants arriving on the US-Mexico border.

However ties between the 2 nations have been examined in current months after Lopez Obrador snubbed Biden by refusing to take part within the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles on the grounds that Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua had not been invited.

That prompted the US president to ask his Mexican counterpart to go to the White Home in July to restore relations.

‘Human crisis’: Chicago seeks help as Texas buses over migrants | Migration News

Chicago says about 125 asylum seekers, lots of them households with babies, arrived on board buses from Texas to this point.

A political battle over the immigration insurance policies of US President Joe Biden’s administration has expanded in latest days, with officers in Chicago asking for volunteers and donations to help with asylum seekers being bused into town from Texas.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot just lately informed reporters that about 125 migrants have arrived within the metropolis on board buses from Texas, together with 50 individuals who arrived on Sunday alone, most of them households.

“We’re a welcoming metropolis, so we’re all the time gonna step up and do the fitting factor to be sure that migrants who’re coming right here to our metropolis are properly obtained,” Lightfoot mentioned throughout a information convention on Sunday night.

The mayor mentioned Chicago had not but heard from any Texas officers and urged the state’s Republican governor, Greg Abbott, to collaborate on a extra humane therapy of the asylum seekers and migrants.

“My frustration comes from the actions of the governor of Texas,” Lightfoot mentioned. “There may very well be a degree of coordination and cooperation however he chooses to do none of these items.”

Political tensions have elevated over the rising variety of asylum seekers arriving on the United States-Mexico border. Abbott, who’s searching for a 3rd time period in workplace within the November midterm elections, has seized on the problem of record-high arrivals on the border to spice up his marketing campaign.

Since April, Texas has bused greater than 7,000 asylum seekers and migrants to Washington, DC, and New York Metropolis, and final week, Abbott started sending buses to Chicago.

He says extra cities may very well be added to the record and that the buses are wanted as a result of the Biden administration has didn’t successfully safe the border.

The Democratic mayors of Washington, DC, and New York Metropolis have denounced the transfer and referred to as on the federal authorities to assist.

Lightfoot on Sunday mentioned a number of assist organisations in Chicago have stepped in and began offering help. “He [Abbott] tries to ship human beings — not cargo, not freight, however human beings — throughout the nation to an unsure vacation spot,” Lightfoot mentioned. “He’s manufacturing a human disaster and it is not sensible to me.”

On Sunday, Chicago launched a brand new web site urging residents to donate objects to assist the brand new arrivals, together with toothpaste, toothbrushes and different toiletries; diapers; blankets; child formulation, and Spanish-language books for youngsters, amongst different issues.

Refugees and migrants waiting
Most of the refugees and migrants being bused from Texas are from Venezuela, Haiti, Cuba and Nicaragua, amongst different international locations [File: Paul Ratje/Reuters]

“We anticipate that the state of Texas will proceed to bus migrants to Chicago and we stay dedicated to offering assist and sources to our newly arrived neighbors throughout this transition interval,” the web site reads.

Chicago is a so-called “sanctuary metropolis”, which signifies that metropolis officers won’t ask residents about their immigration standing or deny them providers on the idea of that standing, nor will they share such info with federal immigration authorities (PDF).

The US has used a pandemic restriction often called “Title 42” to expel most asylum seekers who arrive on the nation’s southern border again to Mexico or to their nation of origin.

Roughly 2 million Title 42 expulsions had been carried out between October 1, 2021, and the tip of July this yr, in accordance with statistics from US Customs and Border Safety. The numbers embrace repeat crossers.

Abbott is busing refugees and migrants out of Texas as a part of a method to share the burden with liberal cities. In response to the Texas Tribute, Texas has to this point spent practically $13m on the trouble.

The Republican governor of Arizona, Doug Ducey, has additionally been sending buses to Washington, DC, and New York Metropolis.

Most of the asylum seekers and migrants being bused come from Venezuela, Haiti, Cuba and Nicaragua, in addition to different international locations. Many are travelling with babies and have struggled to safe everlasting housing, entry training and obtain medical care, volunteers have mentioned.

US high court rules against detained immigrants seeking release | Migration News

Justices rule that immigrants being held for lengthy intervals haven’t any proper to argue for launch as they battle deportation.

The Supreme Courtroom has dominated in opposition to immigrants who’re in search of their launch from lengthy intervals of imprisonment whereas they battle deportation orders.

In two instances determined Monday, the court docket mentioned that the immigrants, who worry persecution if despatched again to their native international locations, haven’t any proper below a federal regulation to a bond listening to at which they may argue for his or her freedom regardless of how lengthy they’re held.

The justices additionally dominated 6-3 to restrict the immigrants’ means to band collectively in court docket, an final result that Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote “will depart many weak noncitizens unable to guard their rights”.

In recent times, the excessive court docket has taken an more and more restricted view of immigrants’ entry to the federal court docket system below immigration measures enacted within the Nineteen Nineties and 2000s.

“For some time, it appeared just like the court docket was going to push again a bit. In excessive instances, it could interpret a statute to permit for as a lot judicial assessment as potential,” mentioned Nicole Hallet, director of the immigrants rights clinic on the College of Chicago regulation faculty. “Clearly now, the court docket is not prepared to try this.”

The immigrants who sued for a bond listening to are going through being imprisoned for a lot of months, even years, earlier than their instances are resolved.

The court docket dominated within the instances of individuals from Mexico and El Salvador who persuaded Homeland Safety officers that their fears are credible, entitling them to additional assessment.

Their attorneys argued that they need to have a listening to earlier than an immigration decide to find out if they need to be launched. The primary elements are whether or not folks would pose a hazard or are prone to flee if let out.

Sotomayor wrote the court docket’s opinion in a single case involving Antonio Arteaga-Martinez, who had beforehand been deported to Mexico. He was taken into custody 4 years in the past, and gained launch whereas his case wound by the federal courts. His listening to on whether or not he can stay in the US is scheduled for 2023.

However Sotomayor wrote that the availability of immigration regulation that applies to folks like Arteaga-Martinez merely doesn’t require the federal government to carry a bond listening to.

The court docket, nevertheless, left open the problem of the immigrants’ means to argue that the Structure doesn’t allow such indefinite imprisonment with out a listening to.

Justice Samuel Alito wrote the court docket’s opinion holding that federal judges can solely rule within the case of the immigrants earlier than them, not a category of equally located folks.

Sotomayor dissented from that call, joined by Justices Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan. She wrote that the power to affix collectively in a category was particularly necessary for individuals who haven’t any proper to a lawyer and “are disproportionately unlikely to be aware of the US authorized system or fluent within the English language”.

The instances are Johnson v. Arteaga-Martinez, 19-896, and Garland v. Aleman Gonzalez, 20-322.

US rolls out migration plan on final day of Americas summit | Migration News

Specialists query whether or not Summit of the Americas declaration will do sufficient to handle urgent wants within the area.

America has unveiled a plan that it says will assist nations throughout the Americas area tackle migration, as President Joe Biden’s administration seeks better cooperation to discourage rising numbers of asylum seekers from searching for to succeed in the US.

The White Home on Friday launched a factsheet describing the “Los Angeles Declaration on Migration and Safety on the Summit of the Americas”, which seeks to “mobilize all the area round daring actions that may rework our strategy to managing migration”.

The Biden administration pledged lots of of tens of millions in assist to Venezuelan migrants throughout the Western Hemisphere, in addition to programmes to assist momentary family-based visas for Cubans and Haitians and ease the hiring of Central American staff, amongst different measures.

Biden and different regional leaders attending the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, California are anticipated to difficulty a joint declaration in a while Friday, the final day of talks which were marked by controversies.

Particularly, the US’s determination to exclude the leaders of Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua over these nations’ rights data has drawn appreciable criticism – and led Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador to skip the summit altogether.

Some leaders this week slammed Washington for not extending invites to all of the heads of state, with analysts additionally declaring that the choice might hamper US efforts to handle urgent points dealing with the Americas.

On the summit’s opening session on Thursday, leaders from Argentina and tiny Belize took to the rostrum to rebuke Biden face-to-face over the visitor listing.

“It’s improper that Cuba and Venezuela [and] Nicaragua are usually not right here,” Barbados Prime Minister Mia Mottley instructed the convention on Friday afternoon, stressing that “we have to converse to these with whom we disagree”.

“These international locations should equally recognise that you just can not need to absolutely take part when you’re not ready equally to interact and to see progress, and the straightforward precedence should be folks – not ideology,” Mottley mentioned.

“I hope that we depart right here right this moment acutely aware that we must not ever once more come to a summit to speak at one another, however merely to speak with one another, in partnership and for the aim of the prosperity of our folks.”

‘Merely not sufficient’

Friday’s declaration aimed to create incentives for international locations taking in giant numbers and unfold duty throughout the area, in addition to cement agreements and commitments already in place.

However some analysts have been sceptical that there could be many significant commitments.

Al Jazeera’s Latin America editor Lucia Newman mentioned whereas the declaration has been touted “as being imaginative, nearly revolutionary … while you have a look at the small print, it’s merely not sufficient to cope with this extraordinary migration disaster that the area is experiencing proper now.”

Newman, reporting from Chile’s capital Santiago, additionally careworn that migration flows within the Americas are usually not solely going within the path of the US and Canada. “But in addition from international locations like Cuba and Venezuela in the direction of South America,” she mentioned.

In the meantime, the absence from the summit of the leaders of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador – the so-called “Northern Triangle” international locations from which many migrants come – additionally has raised doubts about how successfully the proposed pledges will turn out to be actuality.

The Biden administration has sought to dissuade folks from searching for asylum on the US’s southern border amid a surge in arrivals, focusing a lot of its insurance policies on addressing the “root causes” of migration.

However that has not stopped many individuals from attempting to succeed in the US, as dire socioeconomic circumstances, gang violence, unemployment and different points are pushing many to flee their dwelling international locations.

This week, a migrant caravan made up largely of Venezuelans departed from southern Mexico sure for the US. However a pandemic-era restriction generally known as Title 42 has remained in place on the border, permitting American authorities to right away expel most asylum seekers with out providing them an opportunity to use for defense.

A migrant waits of the Mexican side of the border
The US has sought to dissuade asylum seekers from attempting to succeed in its southern border amid a rise in arrivals [Marco Ugarte/AP Photo]

Rwanda to get first batch of asylum seekers from UK this May | Migration News

In April, each international locations signed a controversial immigration deal to take those that enter the UK illegally to the japanese African state.

Rwanda expects the primary group of fifty asylum seekers to be transferred from the UK by the top of Could, a authorities spokesperson has mentioned.

In April, the UK authorities introduced plans to ship folks searching for asylum to the East African nation. However earlier this month, it mentioned it anticipated attorneys to lodge claims to stop their elimination.

“In line with the data now we have, the primary batch of migrants will arrive by the top of the month,” Rwanda’s deputy authorities spokesman Alain Mukurarinda mentioned on Thursday. “However … it’s the British authorities that is aware of what number of will come and when they’ll come.”

In April, each international locations signed a controversial immigration deal to take those that enter the UK illegally to the japanese African state. For its half within the scheme, Rwanda will web $158m.

The United Nations Excessive Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) condemned the scheme as an “egregious breach of worldwide legislation” and “opposite to the letter and spirit of the Refugee Conference”.

Different Western international locations like Denmark are additionally contemplating related offers with Rwanda.